November 8, 2021 - 4:00 pm
A new machine-learning system helps robots understand and perform certain social interactions. Adam Zewe | MIT News Office Robots can deliver food on a college campus and hit a hole-in-one on the golf course, but even the most sophisticated robot can’t perform basic social interactions that are critical to everyday human life. MIT researchers have now incorporated certain social interactions into a framework for robotics, enabling machines to...
November 5, 2021 - 4:30 pm
Politeness doesn’t really amount to much when you’re programmed to get from point A to point B. But if robots are going to play an increased role in human society, questions arise around how precisely they’ll get along with the rest of us. “Robots will live in our world soon enough and they really need to learn how to communicate with us on human terms,” MIT CSAIL research scientist Boris Katz said in a statement tied to a new research paper. “...
November 5, 2021 - 4:00 pm
Neuroscientists find the internal workings of next-word prediction models resemble those of language-processing centers in the brain In the past few years, artificial intelligence models of language have become very good at certain tasks. Most notably, they excel at predicting the next word in a string of text; this technology helps search engines and texting apps predict the next word you are going to type. The most recent generation of...
November 4, 2021 - 4:00 pm
A new machine-learning system helps robots understand and perform certain social interactions. Robots can deliver food on a college campus and hit a hole in one on the golf course, but even the most sophisticated robot can’t perform basic social interactions that are critical to everyday human life. MIT researchers have now incorporated certain social interactions into a framework for robotics, enabling machines to understand what it means to...
November 4, 2021 - 10:00 am
Ballyhooed artificial intelligence technology, known as “deep learning,” brings back ideas 70 years ago. Over the last decade, the best performing artificial intelligence systems, such as smartphone voice recognition and Google’s latest automatic translation capabilities, have come from a technique called “deep learning.” Deep learning is, in fact, a new name for an approach to artificial intelligence called neural networks. Neural networks have...
Vivian Paulun headshot
November 2, 2021 - 4:00 pm
Vivian Paulun
Title: Wobbling, drooping, bouncing—Visual perception of materials and their properties
Abstract: Visual inference of material properties like mass, compliance, elasticity or fragility is crucial to predicting and interacting with our environment. Yet, it is unclear how the brain achieves...
CBMM logo
October 26, 2021 - 4:00 pm
MIBR Seminar Room 46-3189
Drs. Jie Zheng and Mengmi Zhang Please note, Dr. Zhang will be presenting remotely via Zoom.
Abstract:
Jie Zheng's presentation:
Title: Neurons that structure memories of ordered experience in human
 Abstract: The process of constructing temporal associations among related events is essential to episodic memory. However, what neural mechanism helps accomplish this function remains unclear...
October 25, 2021 - 3:00 pm
Neuroscientists find the internal workings of next-word prediction models resemble those of language-processing centers in the brain. Anne Trafton | MIT News Office In the past few years, artificial intelligence models of language have become very good at certain tasks. Most notably, they excel at predicting the next word in a string of text; this technology helps search engines and texting apps predict the next word you are going to type. The...
Graphic image with a photo of a monkey
October 19, 2021 - 4:00 pm
Trenton Bricken and Will Xiao, Kreiman Lab
Will Xiao's presentation
Title: What you see is what IT gets: Responses in primate visual cortex during natural viewing
Abstract: How does the brain support our ability to see? Studies of primate vision have typically focused on controlled viewing conditions exemplified by the rapid serial visual...
October 18, 2021 - 5:00 pm
When asked to classify odors, artificial neural networks adopt a structure that closely resembles that of the brain’s olfactory circuitry. by Jennifer Michalowski | McGovern Institute for Brain Research Using machine learning, a computer model can teach itself to smell in just a few minutes. When it does, researchers have found, it builds a neural network that closely mimics the olfactory circuits that animal brains use to process odors. Animals...
October 18, 2021 - 10:45 am
We seem to be wired to calculate not the shortest path but the “pointiest” one, facing us toward our destination as much as possible. Anne Trafton | MIT News Office Everyone knows the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. However, when you’re walking along city streets, a straight line may not be possible. How do you decide which way to go? A new MIT study suggests that our brains are actually not optimized to calculate the so...
Photo of Prof. Daniela Rus and Dr. Ramin Hasani, MIT CSAIL
October 5, 2021 - 4:00 pm
Singleton Auditorium (46-3002)
Prof. Daniela Rus, Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) , Deputy...
The Fall 2021 Brains, Minds, and Machines (BMM) Seminar Series will be hosted in a hybrid format.
Please see the information included below regarding attending the event either in-person or remotely via Zoom connection
Abstract: In this talk, we will discuss the nuts and bolts of the novel...
storm clouds
September 29, 2021 - 9:00 am
The firm worked with UK weather forecasters to create a model that was better at making short term predictions than existing systems. by Will Douglas Heaven First protein folding, now weather forecasting: London-based AI firm DeepMind is continuing its run applying deep learning to hard science problems. Working with the Met Office, the UK’s national weather service, DeepMind has developed a deep-learning tool called DGMR that can...
Photo of Dr. Lucas Tian, Rockefeller University
September 28, 2021 - 4:00 pm
PILM Seminar Room 46-3310
Dr. Lucas Tian, Rockefeller University
Abstract: Compositionality is a key signature of the mind. It is the ability to generalize from a small set of rules to an almost unlimited set of complex thoughts and behaviors. Compositionality is critical for many domains of intelligence, such as language, social reasoning, and motor planning....
Photo of Prof. Aude Oliva (MIT CSAIL)
September 21, 2021 - 4:00 pm
Singleton Auditorium (46-3002)
Prof. Aude Oliva, Senior Research Scientist, CSAIL; MIT Director MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab; Director MIT Quest...
Abstract: The human brain is a time machine; We are constantly remembering our past, and projecting ourselves into the future. Capturing the brain’s response as these moments unfold could yield valuable insights into both how the brain works and how to better design human-centered AI systems. In...

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